Washington, DC - Every week, millions of Americans work more than 40 hours a week but do not receive the overtime pay they have earned.  Tomorrow, the Department of Labor will be finalizing a rule to fix that by updating overtime protections for workers.  In total, the new rule is expected to extend overtime protections to 4.2 million more Americans who are not currently eligible under federal law, and it is expected to boost wages for workers by $12 billion over the next 10 years.

Washington, DC - Secretary of State John Kerry: "On International Day Against Homophoia, Transphobia, and Biphobia, we stand in solidarity with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) persons worldwide.   We celebrate the progress made to advance a world where all persons are respected and can live free from fear and discrimination.  And today we reaffirm our belief all persons are born free and equal in dignity and rights.

Berkeley, California - At first, it sounds ominous: Molten salts, heated to 600 or even 900 °C (about 1,700°F, pumped through the pipes surrounding a nuclear reactor. But a molten salt mixture may make a smart substitute for water to extract heat from nuclear reactors - or thermal solar power plants - and deliver it to turbines to generate electricity.

Washington, DC - Doors that are obviously meant to be pushed not pulled, footprints painted on the floor telling you where to stand at the airport - these are examples of good design and usability. You don’t have to think too hard about what to do because someone else put a lot of thought into how to get across the right way to open the door or where to form a line.

Cambridge, Massachusetts - Today, 21 percent of the air we breathe is made up of molecular oxygen. But this gas was not always in such ample, life-sustaining supply, and in fact was largely absent from the atmosphere for the first 2 billion years of Earth’s history. When, then, did oxygen first accumulate in the atmosphere?

Boulder, Colorado - Honeybees use their wings to cool down their hives when temperatures rise, but new University of Colorado Boulder research shows that this intriguing behavior may be linked to both the rate of heating and the size of a honeybee group.