Washington, DC - "We believe in giving patients choice and freedom in healthcare, ensuring access to the doctors they want, the treatments they need, and the highest standard of medical care anywhere in the world." ~ President Donald J. Trump

Washington, DC - Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to Xpovio (selinexor) tablets in combination with the corticosteroid dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) who have received at least four prior therapies and whose disease is resistant to several other forms of treatment, including at least two proteasome inhibitors, at least two immunomodulatory agents, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.

Washington, DC - "Since 2012 when the FDA first approved Truvada for a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) indication, there has been a safe and effective HIV prevention method that, when used along with safer sex practices, can help lower the chances of getting sexually-transmitted HIV,” said Debra Birnkrant, M.D., director of FDA’s Division of Antiviral Products. “We have also reinforced to health care professionals and at-risk individuals that before starting PrEP with Truvada, or emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, and during its use, health care professionals should routinely screen patients for HIV, at least once every three months.

Washington, DC - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today released a proposed draft guidance, “Reducing Microbial Food Safety Hazards in the Production of Seed for Sprouting,” intended to make the sprout seed industry (seed growers, conditioners, packers, holders, suppliers, and distributors) aware of the agency’s serious concerns with the continuing outbreaks of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of raw and lightly-cooked sprouts.

Washington, DC -  Diverse perspectives are essential to advancing science, especially in the global health arena where regional, gender and cultural experiences can be quite different. I applaud NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins on his recent announcement that he is committed to inclusiveness and believes it is time to end the tradition of all-male speaking panels at scientific meetings. I and the Fogarty International Center staff enthusiastically join him in this effort.

Dallas, Texas - A large study of Swedish men found that those who were even mildly overweight around age 18 were more likely develop cardiomyopathy in adulthood — an uncommon heart muscle condition that can cause heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.