New Orleans, Louisiana - Adults who received more intensive treatment to lower their blood pressure were less likely to experience drastic blood pressure drops, which can cause dizziness and increase risk of falling, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.

Washington, DC - Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is recommending that duodenoscope manufacturers and health care facilities transition to different types of duodenoscopes that may pose less risk to patient safety. Specifically, because of challenges with cleaning these devices for reuse (reprocessing) and persistent high levels of contamination, the agency is recommending moving away from using duodenoscopes with fixed endcaps to those with disposable components that include disposable endcaps—or to fully disposable duodenoscopes when they become available. Disposable designs simplify or eliminate the need for reprocessing, which may reduce between-patient duodenoscope contamination as compared to reusable, or fixed endcaps.

Washington, DC - During 2012-2016, an average of 43,999 HPV-associated cancers were reported each year, according to a new study published today in CDC’s  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Among the estimated 34,800 cancers probably caused by HPV, 92 percent are attributable to the HPV types that are included in the HPV vaccine and could be prevented if HPV vaccine recommendations were followed, according to the report.

Washington, DC - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hold a joint meeting of the Pediatric Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee on September 26 and 27.

Dallas, Texas - The American Heart Association, the world’s leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all, marks 40 years of bringing heart health programs to schools across the country by awarding financial grants to invest in America’s schools and help educators make whole-body wellness a priority.

Dallas, Texas - People suffering from insomnia may have an increased risk of coronary artery disease, heart failure and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.