Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced a new Energy Materials Network (EMN) consortium, the Durable Module Materials (DuraMat) National Lab Consortium led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). DuraMat is designed to accelerate the development and deployment of new, high performance materials for photovoltaic (PV) modules to lower the cost of electricity generated by solar power, while increasing field lifetime.

Washington, DC - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today it has taken action against 55 tobacco retailers by issuing the first warning letters for selling newly regulated tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, e-liquids and cigars, to minors. These actions come about a month after the FDA began enforcing new federal regulations making it illegal nationwide to sell e-cigarettes, cigars, hookah tobacco, and other newly regulated tobacco products to anyone under age 18 in person and online, and requiring retailers to check photo ID of anyone under age 27, among other restrictions.

Washington, DC - IT security departments have used guidance from NIST and other sources to help them defend the vulnerable connections between mobile devices and enterprise computer systems from malware, viruses and other types of attacks. Recently, organizations from both the public and private sectors have requested more specific information on threats and ways to mitigate them.

Washington, DC - A high school diploma is no longer enough to ensure that Americans have the skills they need to move into the good-paying careers they love. By the end of this decade, 65 percent of all job openings will require an education or skills-training beyond what any student receives in high school. In fact, 11 of the 15 fastest-growing occupations will require a postsecondary education.

Washington, DC - The United States welcomes The Sentry’s report chronicling public corruption among South Sudan’s leaders, including President Salva Kiir and Riek Machar.

San Diego, California - A study released this week (Sept. 12, 2016) is shedding new light on how scientists evaluate polar bear diet and weight loss during their fasting season. On average, a polar bear loses up to 30 percent of its total body mass while fasting during the open-water season. Although some scientists previously believed land-based foods could supplement the bears’ nutritional needs until the sea ice returns, a new study by San Diego Zoo Global conservationists published in the scientific journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology has revealed that access to terrestrial food is not sufficient to reduce the rate of body mass loss for fasting polar bears.