Washington, DC - A novel approach to immunotherapy developed by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has led to the complete regression of breast cancer in a patient who was unresponsive to all other treatments. This patient received the treatment in a clinical trial led by Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Surgery Branch at NCI’s Center for Cancer Research (CCR), and the findings were published June 4, 2018 in Nature Medicine. NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

West Lafayette, Indiana - A Purdue-affiliated startup is developing a low-cost, high-tech solution to address the nationwide health crisis of Americans failing to take their medicine as prescribed.  The Internet of Things system reminds patients to take medications and quickly alerts caregivers or providers when intervention is needed.

Washington, DC - For patients with serious or immediately life-threatening diseases, the FDA remains committed to enhancing access to promising investigational medicines for those unable to access products through clinical trials. This is the mission of our expanded access program. The agency is dedicated to these purposes, and it has been for more than three decades.

Washington, DC - Today, a senior-level Chinese delegation is beginning a first-of-its-kind study visit to observe drug prevention and treatment practices in the United States. This U.S.-China effort to reduce demand for narcotics complements recent productive cooperation to reduce supply, most notably by placing restrictive controls on synthetic opioids.

Washington, DC - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approval of Xeljanz (tofacitinib) to include adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis. Xeljanz is the first oral medication approved for chronic use in this indication. Other FDA-approved treatments for the chronic treatment of moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis must be administered through an intravenous infusion or subcutaneous injection.

Dallas, Texas - Patients with heart failure who felt socially isolated were much more likely to die or be hospitalized than more socially connected patients, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.