Washington, DC - Critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) did not benefit from two antipsychotic drugs used to treat delirium, according to a large clinical trial funded by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health. The multi-site team that conducted the trial found no evidence that treatment with antipsychotic medicines — haloperidol or ziprasidone — affected delirium, survival, length of ICU or hospital stay or safety. The findings from the Modifying the Impact of ICU-Associated Neurological Dysfunction-USA (MIND-USA) Study were published online Oct. 22, 2018 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Washington, DC - Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration permitted marketing of the PicoAMH Elisa diagnostic test as an aid in the determination of a patient’s menopausal status.

Washington, DC - Thursday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) announced $293 million in awards to primary health care clinicians and students through the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) and Nurse Corps programs.

Atlanta, Georgia - New research shows obesity may be contributing to increasing rates of colorectal cancer among younger Americans. A study published October 11, 2018 in JAMA Oncology tracked the health of more than 85,000 women for 22 years and found the higher a woman’s body mass index (BMI), the greater her risk of developing colorectal cancer before age 50.

Washington, DC - Transcript for CDC Telebriefing: Update on Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) in the United States:

Washington, DC - An unhealthy population of microbes in the mouth triggers specialized immune cells that inflame and destroy tissues, leading to the type of bone loss associated with a severe form of gum disease, according to a new study in mice and humans. The research, led by scientists from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) at the National Institutes of Health and the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, could have implications for new treatment approaches for the condition. The findings appear online Oct. 17, 2018, in Science Translational Medicine.