Washington, DC - Three-year outcomes from an ongoing clinical trial suggest that high-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by transplantation of a person's own blood-forming stem cells may induce sustained remission in some people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). RRMS is the most common form of MS, a progressive autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the brain and spinal cord.

Dallas, Texas - A clinical trial that combined stereotactic body radiation therapy with a specific chemotherapy regimen more than doubled survival rates for certain stage 4 lung cancer patients, UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers report.

Baltimore, Maryland - Already known to cut proteins, the enzyme SPPL3 turns out to have additional talents, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins. In its newly discovered role, SPPL3 works without cutting proteins to activate T cells, the immune system’s foot soldiers. Because its structure is similar to that of presenilin enzymes, which have been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers believe their findings could shed more light on presenilin functions, in addition to providing new insight into how the immune system is controlled.

Imperial, California - There's no clear link between caffeine intake and depression. However, caffeine intake and depression may be linked indirectly for people who are particularly sensitive to the effects of caffeine or who have too much caffeine.

Rochester, Minnesota - The most popular New Year’s resolutions are about physical and mental health -  lose weight, eat healthier, quit smoking, drink less alcohol. Yet, we often forget about sexual health. People who are happy with their sexual health tend to be happier people.  Why not make a resolution about sexual health?

Imperial, California - The New Year is here, and resolutions are ever-present. Many of these commitments to betterment involve some form of health improvement but lifestyle changes are easier planned than implemented. However, Mayo Clinic Health System family physician Daniel Stahl, M.D., points out there may be some low-hanging fruit when it comes to enhancing your well-being next year. While some of these suggestions are obvious, Dr. Stahl says they can’t be reiterated enough and shares basic keys for a healthier 2015.