Cambridge, Massachusetts - Ioannis V. Yannas, professor of polymer science and engineering in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering, was recognized as one of the highest achievers in his field last week when the National Inventors Hall of Fame announced it would be inducting him at their 2015 ceremony this May. With this honor, which recognizes his invention of what has become known as "artificial skin," Yannas joins a small group of approximately 500 renowned Hall-of-Fame inventors.

Cambridge, Massachusetts - During the 2012 election season, Edward Schiappa closely watched the campaign in his longtime home of Minnesota, where voters were entertaining a measure called Amendment 1. A “yes” vote would have changed the state constitution to make marriage legal only between a man and a woman; a “no” vote would have been a move in favor of gay rights.

Cambridge, Massachusetts - As a grape slowly dries and shrivels, its surface creases, ultimately taking on the wrinkled form of a raisin. Similar patterns can be found on the surfaces of other dried materials, as well as in human fingerprints. While these patterns have long been observed in nature, and more recently in experiments, scientists have not been able to come up with a way to predict how such patterns arise in curved systems, such as microlenses.

Washington, DC - While aspects of the U.S. economy have improved, money continues to be a top cause of stress for Americans, according to the new Stress in America™: Paying With Our Health survey released today by the American Psychological Association. According to the survey, parents, younger generations and those living in lower-income households report higher levels of stress than Americans overall, especially when it comes to stress about money.

Austin, Texas - Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin's Cockrell School of Engineering have created the first transistors made of silicene, the world’s thinnest silicon material. Their research holds the promise of building dramatically faster, smaller and more efficient computer chips.

Washington, DC - Medical device manufacturer Medtronic Inc. has agreed to pay the United States $2.8 million to resolve allegations under the False Claims Act that Medtronic caused certain physicians to submit false claims to federal health care programs for a medical procedure known as “SubQ stimulation,” the Justice Department announced today.