Rochester, Minnesota - Chip Davis, composer and founder of Mannheim Steamroller, entertains holiday audiences every season. He's mostly known for his Christmas music. But he's also teamed up with experts at Mayo Clinic and other health institutions to bring a new experience to some patients. It's called ambient therapy. The goal is to make patients feel as if they've been transported to calmer surroundings. Some patients say they even feel less pain when they listen to it.

Rochester, Minnesota - Have you had your flu shot? Consider this. Dec. 3 - 9 is National Influenza Vaccination Week, a reminder that everyone 6 months and older should be encouraged to get vaccinated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports higher than usual flu activity around the U.S. than is usually seen this time of year.

Scottsdale, Arizona - Echinacea to prevent colds. Ginkgo to improve memory. Flaxseed to lower cholesterol. The list of herbal remedies goes on and on.

Washington, DC - Results from two Phase 1 clinical trials show an experimental Zika vaccine developed by government scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is safe and induces an immune response in healthy adults. The findings will be published on December 4 in The Lancet. NIAID is currently leading an international effort to evaluate the investigational vaccine in a Phase 2/2b safety and efficacy trial.

Scottsdale, Arizona - It's the time of year when food takes center place. You may find yourself packing plates high with mashed potatoes or  snacking on stacks of chips. From family gatherings to treats in the office, high-sodium snacks and foods are everywhere. Too much salt can lead to  problems for some people with high blood pressure or heart failure. But what's too much?

Atlanta, Georgia - A new study suggests that an American Cancer Society program has been effective in promoting improvements in colorectal cancer screening rates in federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). The study appears early online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, and the authors say it has implications for broader public health efforts to increase cancer prevention and screening.