Washington, DC - The Secretary’s Office of Religion and Global Affairs, the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, and the U.S. Embassy to the Holy See -- in partnership with the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University and Caritas Internationalis -- are hosting a workshop to strengthen faith-based engagement in combating the emergence and spread of anti-microbial resistance (AMR). The workshop will take place December 12-15 in Rome, Italy.

Rochester, Minnesota - Research shows that eating a heart-healthy diet can decrease your risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. Mayo Clinic experts say the same may hold true for your brain. Eating right may impact the disease process behind Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.

Rochester, Minnesota - After diabetes and high blood pressure, glomerulonephritis is the third leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., according to the U.S. Renal Data System.

Scottsdale, Arizona - Epilepsy, also known as a seizure disorder, is a neurological condition affecting the nervous system. Epileptic seizures are caused by disturbances in the electrical activity of the brain. These seizures may be related to a brain injury or a family tendency, but most of the time the cause is unknown. In fact, in two-thirds of patients diagnosed with epilepsy, the cause is unknown.

Rochester, Minnesota - Chip Davis, composer and founder of Mannheim Steamroller, entertains holiday audiences every season. He's mostly known for his Christmas music. But he's also teamed up with experts at Mayo Clinic and other health institutions to bring a new experience to some patients. It's called ambient therapy. Davis uses a recording system to capture nature sounds. He then installs custom-made sound delivery equipment into operating rooms and patient rooms. He describes the sound as being three-dimensional.

Rochester, Minnesota - Genetic testing for the gene mutations associated with breast cancer, called BRCA1 and BRCA2, is offered to people who are likely to have inherited one of the mutations, based on their personal and family medical history. There are other newer genetic tests that may be available, too, depending on a person’s family cancer history.